This Is What Is Wrong With The US Economy

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  1. #1

    Default This Is What Is Wrong With The US Economy

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.2abce2d4d930


    When a person goes to school, works really hard and gets a masters degree, you would think there would be high demand for this person, and they should be making bank. Especially in an area like Washington DC, right?

    Instead, they can count on getting a job that rakes in somewhere around $34,000 a year.

    Just to give you how an idea of ridiculous this is, I earn $36,000 a year and I don't even have a 2 year degree, let alone a masters. And I live in Syracuse, NY and not Washington DC.

    This is the kind of stuff that creates dictators. Peace, land, and bread become real irresistible when you're struggling to make ends meet like this.
    Don't blame me, I voted for Gary Johnson.




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  3. #2

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    The other issue is that employers generally don't want to pay for training. So everyone gets a degree and pays for it themselves. But now that everyone has a degree, it's worth less.

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    And many of the degrees are useless toward a real world job.

    What do you mean I can't land a six figure job with a Master's Degree in Women's Studies or English literature? There were way too many baby boomer parents telling their Gen X and Millenial Progeny that its more important to study something your interested in rather than something you can get a job with. Thus two whole generations of people with degrees worth nothing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JediMindTrick View Post
    And many of the degrees are useless toward a real world job.

    What do you mean I can't land a six figure job with a Master's Degree in Women's Studies or English literature? There were way too many baby boomer parents telling their Gen X and Millenial Progeny that its more important to study something your interested in rather than something you can get a job with. Thus two whole generations of people with degrees worth nothing.
    Can't agree.

    I have been acquainted with a few people who went on to productive lives with liberal arts degrees--NOT women's studies, & they took in a few instances grad work, but one became a paralegal; another runs his own sales territory with an English degree, another teaches at the collegiate level.

    For the life of me, I wish I had gone into teaching with my foreign language degree, but that's another story.

    There are people with science degrees who start out un or underemployed. Some end up working in other fields besides their degree field.

    As for the O P comment about students having a grad degree & starting out at 34K per annum, particularly if that graduate doesn't have any or much work experience, most likely they're starting out as trainees & will advance beyond this when they have more experience. Many prospective employers--had the experience when I was that age & am acquainted with millenials going through it--don't give much credit to earning a degree but having little or no work experience behind it.

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    "This is the kind of stuff that creates dictators. Peace, land, and bread become real irresistible when you're struggling to make ends meet like this."

    Did the graduates in your example accrue much work experience?

    Are they willing to do jobs that maybe aren't their dream jobs, but will get their feet in the door & some experience on a resume?

    Perhaps it's time to start emphasizing entry level work while in the teen years, or at least volunteer work, & maybe, as with some European countries, encourage more to take advantage of vocational programs at the high school level that will teach them a trade. That is, if those programs haven't been cut where they attend school.

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    Quote Originally Posted by floydefisher View Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.2abce2d4d930


    When a person goes to school, works really hard and gets a masters degree, you would think there would be high demand for this person, and they should be making bank. Especially in an area like Washington DC, right?

    Instead, they can count on getting a job that rakes in somewhere around $34,000 a year.

    Just to give you how an idea of ridiculous this is, I earn $36,000 a year and I don't even have a 2 year degree, let alone a masters. And I live in Syracuse, NY and not Washington DC.

    This is the kind of stuff that creates dictators. Peace, land, and bread become real irresistible when you're struggling to make ends meet like this.
    Choosing what field to degree in is critical. For example, an engineer with a bachelors, regardless of the specific discipline, can expect to land a job that pays over $50,000 right out of school. Whereas a Bachelorette in Humanities, Social Work or Advertising for example, may not pay the rent let alone your student loans.

    "A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep." - Saul Bellow

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sponge Bob View Post
    Can't agree.

    I have been acquainted with a few people who went on to productive lives with liberal arts degrees--NOT women's studies, & they took in a few instances grad work, but one became a paralegal; another runs his own sales territory with an English degree, another teaches at the collegiate level.

    For the life of me, I wish I had gone into teaching with my foreign language degree, but that's another story.

    There are people with science degrees who start out un or underemployed. Some end up working in other fields besides their degree field.

    As for the O P comment about students having a grad degree & starting out at 34K per annum, particularly if that graduate doesn't have any or much work experience, most likely they're starting out as trainees & will advance beyond this when they have more experience. Many prospective employers--had the experience when I was that age & am acquainted with millenials going through it--don't give much credit to earning a degree but having little or no work experience behind it.
    There are exceptions on both sides of the higher education spectrum. I think the issue brought forth by the OP is that many young people have the attitude that employers have an obligation to reward a new graduate simply because they got a degree. The reality is, employers hire people to do a job that contributes to the success of the employers, not the other way around. The real word, the working world, is not a big social game where they hand out first place trophies to everyone who enters the race. Itís time this generation realized that.

    "A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep." - Saul Bellow

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samm View Post
    There are exceptions on both sides of the higher education spectrum. I think the issue brought forth by the OP is that many young people have the attitude that employers have an obligation to reward a new graduate simply because they got a degree. The reality is, employers hire people to do a job that contributes to the success of the employers, not the other way around. The real word, the working world, is not a big social game where they hand out first place trophies to everyone who enters the race. Itís time this generation realized that.
    "I think the issue brought forth by the OP is that many young people have the attitude that employers have an obligation to reward a new graduate simply because they got a degree."

    I agree 100%.

    That's why I support encouraging the young to volunteer & even accept minimum wage jobs from the time they're 16 & can get one without a signed permit from a parent or guardian.

    Many employers are looking at experience--that is the advised method to write up a resume now is start with experience, THEN education. They can be cynical when interviewing a recent college grad with relatively little or no experience.

    Even waitressing & washing dishes count.

    That employer knows there is someone they can call to attest that this applicant has a proven track record of showing up; doing particular duties; and leaving on schedule.

    They're taking more of a chance with college grads with no work experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sponge Bob View Post
    "I think the issue brought forth by the OP is that many young people have the attitude that employers have an obligation to reward a new graduate simply because they got a degree."

    I agree 100%.

    That's why I support encouraging the young to volunteer & even accept minimum wage jobs from the time they're 16 & can get one without a signed permit from a parent or guardian.

    Many employers are looking at experience--that is the advised method to write up a resume now is start with experience, THEN education. They can be cynical when interviewing a recent college grad with relatively little or no experience.

    Even waitressing & washing dishes count.

    That employer knows there is someone they can call to attest that this applicant has a proven track record of showing up; doing particular duties; and leaving on schedule.

    They're taking more of a chance with college grads with no work experience.
    I agree. A job resume that includes menial labor tells the employer as much if not more about the prospective employee as the GPA on their transcript.

    "A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep." - Saul Bellow

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    The woman in the article made a series of ineffective decisions, one of which was to stay in a small town where the employment options are meager. The third-largest employer is the tiny university she attended.
    Trump supporters have space bugs in their heads. It is the only explanation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reflechissez View Post
    The woman in the article made a series of ineffective decisions, one of which was to stay in a small town where the employment options are meager. The third-largest employer is the tiny university she attended.
    A ton of labor problems in this country would be solved with higher worker mobility.

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  24. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by floydefisher View Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.2abce2d4d930


    When a person goes to school, works really hard and gets a masters degree, you would think there would be high demand for this person, and they should be making bank. Especially in an area like Washington DC, right?

    Instead, they can count on getting a job that rakes in somewhere around $34,000 a year.

    Just to give you how an idea of ridiculous this is, I earn $36,000 a year and I don't even have a 2 year degree, let alone a masters. And I live in Syracuse, NY and not Washington DC.

    This is the kind of stuff that creates dictators. Peace, land, and bread become real irresistible when you're struggling to make ends meet like this.
    No I don't think that.

    I think that more than half if all degrees are degrees in college completion, and are not in any particular field that is in demand. (History, philosophy, liberal arts etc.)

    I don't necessarily think that such degrees are a bad idea, but I have never read "Help Wanted, Philosopher."

    It IS a bad idea to think that all degrees lead equally to employment. If high income is what a person seeks, then one should chose a high-income degree. One should not chose a generic degree and then claim the economy is malfunctioning for treating it as such.

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    Oh, and the underlying problem with the economy is that Americans have a lower savings rate but expect the same returns as if they had a higher one, like the returns earlier generatiobs hot with their higher savings rates.

    Garbage in garbage out also applies to ones savings.

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    I know people with only a high school diploma making $100-$140 a year. It’s all according to how hard you want to work. The degree just gets your foot in the door... if you’re in it for the money, don’t pick the wrong door.
    If Peeing Your Pants Is Cool Consider Me Miles Davis

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaius View Post
    No I don't think that.

    I think that more than half if all degrees are degrees in college completion, and are not in any particular field that is in demand. (History, philosophy, liberal arts etc.)

    I don't necessarily think that such degrees are a bad idea, but I have never read "Help Wanted, Philosopher."

    It IS a bad idea to think that all degrees lead equally to employment. If high income is what a person seeks, then one should chose a high-income degree. One should not chose a generic degree and then claim the economy is malfunctioning for treating it as such.
    I've never read a HELP WANTED ad that prioritized a degree. Even degree holders in the sciences get frustrated because many prospective employers want a minimum of experience.

    As far as "high income degrees", not everyone has the patience with the patients to do nursing or medicine, nor the mathematics nor physical sciences aptitude for engineering.

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