This Is What Is Wrong With The US Economy - Page 3

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  1. #1

    Default This Is What Is Wrong With The US Economy

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.2abce2d4d930


    When a person goes to school, works really hard and gets a masters degree, you would think there would be high demand for this person, and they should be making bank. Especially in an area like Washington DC, right?

    Instead, they can count on getting a job that rakes in somewhere around $34,000 a year.

    Just to give you how an idea of ridiculous this is, I earn $36,000 a year and I don't even have a 2 year degree, let alone a masters. And I live in Syracuse, NY and not Washington DC.

    This is the kind of stuff that creates dictators. Peace, land, and bread become real irresistible when you're struggling to make ends meet like this.
    Don't blame me, I voted for Gary Johnson.




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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackWolf View Post
    To the best of my knowledge I've never had a prospective employer confirm my education. I've had a few contact previous employers, but even then it never progressed much beyond asking a few basic questions. "Did he work here? What was his position? Would you hire him again?"

    At this point in my life my impression is that unless you are applying for a degree-specific position employers don't care what you studied in college. More generally their concerns fall along certain lines: Were you able to commit to a goal and have the discipline to follow through? Did you learn how to communicate effectively? Problem solve? Conduct research? Follow directions? Think abstractly, or outside one's own experience/comfort levels? Those are baseline skills an employer can build on. That doesn't mean applicants without a college education don't have those skills, only that a degree provides a convenient (if imperfect) guide for an employer. Other factors of course come into play - work experience is the big one, but intangibles like an applicant's bearing and attitude go a long way toward an employer deciding whether it's in a company's interest to take a risk on a person.

    It's been my personal experience that once my foot was in the door, it was almost entirely on me how far I progressed with luck playing a smaller but still significant role.
    Isn't there legally also a limit to what prospective employers can ask of any former employers?

    Every so often I read articles on interview techniques & job search tips for that worst case scenario, should that arise.

    I read the ones oriented towards employers, too.

    There was one this one day on "How to Spot a Potential Sociopath".

    It was interesting. Such a person will talk to the point of overpowering the potential employer to divert from their lack of stability. Particularly if female, if a male interviewee seems to be trying to "butter up" the interviewer, ex I love your hair, that isn't a good sign.

    Prospective employers were advised to speak with not only listed references, but get names of other coworkers, both those who had a favorable & those who had unfavorable opinions of the person looking for a job.

    But isn't there legally only so much a reference can say as well? Or is this a more grey area?

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  5. #32
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    Seems to me more education is being required of various positions ex. what once took a two year degree now requires four.

    IMO This trend in itself is problematic.

    It does relay not aging, but emotional maturity gained with the young adult's entry into full time work. It delays marriage, or at least moving out on one's own & learning to prioritize expenditures. It delays by several years--unless the young person is working full time & attending college part time--saving for retirement. Prioritizing higher education to the point growing up is delayed is not part of a good trend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sponge Bob View Post
    Isn't there legally also a limit to what prospective employers can ask of any former employers?

    Every so often I read articles on interview techniques & job search tips for that worst case scenario, should that arise.

    I read the ones oriented towards employers, too.

    There was one this one day on "How to Spot a Potential Sociopath".

    It was interesting. Such a person will talk to the point of overpowering the potential employer to divert from their lack of stability. Particularly if female, if a male interviewee seems to be trying to "butter up" the interviewer, ex I love your hair, that isn't a good sign.

    Prospective employers were advised to speak with not only listed references, but get names of other coworkers, both those who had a favorable & those who had unfavorable opinions of the person looking for a job.

    But isn't there legally only so much a reference can say as well? Or is this a more grey area?
    My understanding of it is limited to the state university my wife works at. She is only allowed to confirm with an employer that someone she interviews did in fact work at the company they claim and for the dates listed. She is able to ask an employer if they would hire the person again. Other than that, nothing. The employer, of course, if free to volunteer any additional information if they so choose.

    I'm unaware if the same rules apply for other places of business.
    You're messin' with the wrong wolf, baby/Darkness gonna break your light - ​Dorothy, "Missile"

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    Quote Originally Posted by janer View Post
    To the question "What exactly is a living wage", I would say that it's an income that allows a worker to cover rent, food, insurance, transportation and an emergency/retirement fund. I would consider these necessary to a self-supporting worker.
    What I hear from a lot of young people - and I am not talking about unskilled or minimum wage earners - is that their salaries only provide the bare minimum - rent, food, transportation to and from work - and there is little left to put aside for retirement, emergencies or even health insurance (unless they are in public sector jobs - i.e., teachers - where health insurance and pension are covered. Many of them take second part time jobs waitressing or bartending, but the reality is, our common denominator is that we all only get a 24 hour day, so there is a limit to how much of that can be done.
    It wasn't any different in my day right out of college (with a sellable degree in engineering.) For several years I had to have 2 or 3 room mates to afford the rent. We shopped the Wednesday specials at the grocery store and none of us even remotely considered buying a new car or had health insurance. And save for retirement? You have to be kidding; that never crossed our minds. But we all thought we had it pretty darned good, because we were getting along on our own not living under mom and dad's roof anymore.

    Kids today seem to think that they are the first generation to have to struggle after they graduate when in fact, most of them have it better than we did. Of course part of it is probably because we didn't have to but the latest $600 phone every year, or have a big flat screen with an Xbox and drink $4 lattes twice a day just to get by.

    "A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep." - Saul Bellow

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  11. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samm View Post
    It wasn't any different in my day right out of college (with a sellable degree in engineering.) For several years I had to have 2 or 3 room mates to afford the rent. We shopped the Wednesday specials at the grocery store and none of us even remotely considered buying a new car or had health insurance. And save for retirement? You have to be kidding; that never crossed our minds. But we all thought we had it pretty darned good, because we were getting along on our own not living under mom and dad's roof anymore.

    Kids today seem to think that they are the first generation to have to struggle after they graduate when in fact, most of them have it better than we did. Of course part of it is probably because we didn't have to but the latest $600 phone every year, or have a big flat screen with an Xbox and drink $4 lattes twice a day just to get by.
    Back in mah day we had to walk 2 miles 4 fresh water!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samm View Post
    It wasn't any different in my day right out of college (with a sellable degree in engineering.) For several years I had to have 2 or 3 room mates to afford the rent. We shopped the Wednesday specials at the grocery store and none of us even remotely considered buying a new car or had health insurance. And save for retirement? You have to be kidding; that never crossed our minds. But we all thought we had it pretty darned good, because we were getting along on our own not living under mom and dad's roof anymore.

    Kids today seem to think that they are the first generation to have to struggle after they graduate when in fact, most of them have it better than we did. Of course part of it is probably because we didn't have to but the latest $600 phone every year, or have a big flat screen with an Xbox and drink $4 lattes twice a day just to get by.
    Same for me back in the late 80s early 90s. It took at least two paychecks to get any halfway decent apartment and I had a good job at New Jersey Bell. If you find a roommate or two you'd be in decent shape. I just chose to stay at home until I was 26.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ImRightYoureWrong View Post
    Back in mah day we had to walk 2 miles 4 fresh water!!!!
    Uphill both ways?

    "A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep." - Saul Bellow

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toll Collector View Post
    Same for me back in the late 80s early 90s. It took at least two paychecks to get any halfway decent apartment and I had a good job at New Jersey Bell. If you find a roommate or two you'd be in decent shape. I just chose to stay at home until I was 26.
    Same in the '990's in Florida.

    Eventually I rented by myself.

    But not right out of college.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sponge Bob View Post
    Same in the '990's in Florida.

    Eventually I rented by myself.

    But not right out of college.
    Now that's going back a bit before my time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toll Collector View Post
    Now that's going back a bit before my time.
    "The '990's"

    Oops, typo

    But yeah, nobody in the '90's that I recall had an apartment by themselves right after college.

    They might take on some roommates, as in bigger cities on the coast, but by themselves right after graduating?

    Generally no.

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  23. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samm View Post
    It wasn't any different in my day right out of college (with a sellable degree in engineering.) For several years I had to have 2 or 3 room mates to afford the rent. We shopped the Wednesday specials at the grocery store and none of us even remotely considered buying a new car or had health insurance. And save for retirement? You have to be kidding; that never crossed our minds. But we all thought we had it pretty darned good, because we were getting along on our own not living under mom and dad's roof anymore.

    Kids today seem to think that they are the first generation to have to struggle after they graduate when in fact, most of them have it better than we did. Of course part of it is probably because we didn't have to but the latest $600 phone every year, or have a big flat screen with an Xbox and drink $4 lattes twice a day just to get by.
    At least you guys wanted to move out of your parents' home.

    Many in their early to mid 20s have no shame admitting they're still on their parent's plan & eligible to remain there until they're 26.

    And these are people with full time jobs with major employers.

    They remind me of the buzzard in the Warner Brothers cartoon was mistakenly left by the drunken stork in the owls' nest. When papa owl tries to get a very big buzzard out of the nest, he gets to the tip of the big branch saying "Nope nope nope nope nope can't do that" and comes back to the nest. We used to imitate the buzzard from that cartoon in the middle school years.

    It's funny on WB, but not so funny when young adults don't want to grow up & try anyting on their own.

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  25. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samm View Post
    It wasn't any different in my day right out of college (with a sellable degree in engineering.) For several years I had to have 2 or 3 room mates to afford the rent. We shopped the Wednesday specials at the grocery store and none of us even remotely considered buying a new car or had health insurance. And save for retirement? You have to be kidding; that never crossed our minds. But we all thought we had it pretty darned good, because we were getting along on our own not living under mom and dad's roof anymore.

    Kids today seem to think that they are the first generation to have to struggle after they graduate when in fact, most of them have it better than we did. Of course part of it is probably because we didn't have to but the latest $600 phone every year, or have a big flat screen with an Xbox and drink $4 lattes twice a day just to get by.
    "And save for your retirement? You have to be kidding;"

    Nope.

    I advised in a millenial thread on FB that it was never too early to start.

    Generally major employers like employees to be working there for about a year before starting.

    But even if all they save at that time is what will be matched, it's something.

    You just can't take out a loan to cover your retirement.

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